Louise Solheim, who gave Ping’s iconic putter the name Anser, has died

Louise Solheim, the wife of the late Ping Golf founder Karsten Solheim and by choice a silent partner in the family business, died on Saturday. She was 99.“Our mother preferred working behind the scenes,” their son Allan D. Solheim said in a news release. “Karsten’s tinkering with putter designs in our garage began as a hobby, but it quickly turned into a thriving business. From the beginning, my mother assumed the administrative side of the business, allowing Karsten to focus on club
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How the Ping Anser Putter, One of the Most Iconic Clubs, Came To Be

 By E. Michael Johnson   The most popular putter style of all time started with a drawing on a 78 r.p.m. record jacket.  That is the canvas Karsten Solheim, a Norwegian-born engineer who worked on jet fighters and missile guidance systems after World War II, used to sketch the Ping Anser putter in January 1966. A few weeks later, Solheim brought the club to the PGA Tour’s Phoenix Open and piqued the interest of players such as George Archer, Kermit Zarley and Gene Littler—all who soon put it in
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